SAN GABRIEL VALLEY LEAGUE GIRLS VOLLEYBALL Gahr survives pesky upstart Lynwood, punches ticket to postseason

By Loren Kopff

 

LYNWOOD-The Gahr girls volleyball team entered its regular season finale with Lynwood knowing that it could finish as high as second place in the San Gabriel Valley League, or completely miss the playoffs. Although Lynwood had upset the Gladiators at home last season and taken Gahr to four sets earlier this year, head coach Iris Najera wasn’t nervous at all.

She was confident that her team would win, which they did 25-21, 23-25, 25-19, 27-25, but just to be on the safe side, she had a message for her team before the start of the match.

“I reminded the girls of what happened last year,” Najera said. “The people who were part of the team last year remembered but the new people didn’t know. So it was important that they knew that this match is really big. We always knew that Lynwood is a very physical team and they’re very aggressive.”

Gahr ends the regular season at 9-14 overall and 6-4 in the league. The Gladiators tied Paramount for second place but because of a season-sweep over the Pirates, will go in the California Interscholastic Federation-Southern Section Division II-AA playoffs as the league’s second place representative.

Gahr was down 6-3 and 8-5 but a serving error on Lynwood allowed the Gladiators to tie the first set at 9-9 and from there, junior setter Niahni Moultry served five straight points. The Knights, though, would battle back and after an ace from Jessica Montoya, the set was tied at 20-20. After Najera called a timeout, another serving error led to junior libero Naomi Belgrave serving the next two points with an ace and a double hit violation on Lynwood.

Both teams combined for 10 aces and 18 kills in the set but it was becoming apparent that Lynwood’s offense throughout the match would come from two players-Esther Duru (four kills, three blocks) and Alexxsis Todd (two kills) in the first set. And they were just warming up.

Lynwood built a 10-5 lead in the second set on five kills from Duru and three more from Todd. But junior middle blocker Tyra Parrish didn’t want any part of that as she had three kills, plus a pair of aces from junior Kathryn Pedraza to tie the set at 10-10. Eventually, Gahr had a 23-20 lead but Duru had three kills and Todd added an ace down the stretch to give the Knights the victory.

“They’re great hitters and it’s difficult to defend because you don’t know if the setter is going to set the two in the middle or the back row in the middle,” Najera said. “They have a really good offense working.”

Lynwood started the third set strong, building a 5-1 lead and was still ahead at 7-5 before Parrish knocked down her ninth kill. Then Moultry reeled off five straight points to give Gahr a lead it would not relinquish. She had three aces and Parrish had a kill and a block during Moultry’s serve. Then with Gahr up 15-11, senior setter Frankie Di Iorio served six straight points, four of which were aces.

But Lynwood rallied to make the set much closer than what it really was thanks to three kills from Todd, two aces from Duru and an ace from Linda Ruiz.

“I just had a nice talk with my girls about momentum and how volleyball is all about momentum, more so than any other sport because if you win a point, the winner of the point gets the next serve and you’re attacking again,” Najera said. “Every other sport, if one team wins a point, the opponent has a chance.”

Both teams would tie 10 times in the fourth set and there were six lead changes with Parrish and senior outside hitter Destiny Hayes providing most of the action for Gahr and Duru and Todd the same for the Knights. Gahr had leads of four points on two separate occasions only to see Lynwood come back to forge a tie. Todd’s 19th and 20th kill put Lynwood at set point twice. But Hayes would respond with her 14th and 15th kill respectively. Then Di Iorio served the biggest two points of her senior season, both of them aces to end the match. She would have nine aces in the match.

“It’s very rare to have a [freshman] starter come in and that is what Frankie was four years ago,” Najera said. “She has always set the tone for us. She has run our offense. I give her the freedom to run our offense because when I used to play softball and I was the catcher, I liked calling the plays. It was very fitting for her to have a really good serving day like she did and then to end it with her serving.”

Parrish finished with 14 kills while senior outside hitter Stephanie Rodriguez and Moultry added six and five kills respectively. Even though Gahr had its worst record since going 9-18 in 1999 and finished with a losing record for the second straight season and third out of the last four seasons, it avoided staying home for the playoffs for the first time since 2008. Now, Gahr is hoping to get past the first round for the first time since 2005.

“It was a stressful season and my girls always played hard,” Najera said. “They just sometimes get overwhelmed. So, it was a big relief to win this game.”

 

 

WEEK NINE FOOTBALL Artesia’s second half rally not enough to overcome early mistakes

PHOTO BY ARMANDO VARGAS   Photo caption: Artesia senior running back Vincent Brown picks up yardage before being knocked out of bounds by Bellflower's Austin Jones in last Friday's game. Bellflower defeated the Pioneers 30-16 as Brown picked up 123 all-purpose yards.

 

By Loren Kopff

 

BELLFLOWER-Artesia’s football team had mostly been a first half squad throughout most of the 2014 season, having led or being tied at the break in five of its first eight games. In fact, the Pioneers had a lead going into the fourth quarter in another contest and could have easily had five or even six wins entering its tilt against Bellflower last Friday night.

But 16 points in the second half wasn’t enough to recover from a shaky first half and the Pioneers dropped a 30-16 decision to the Buccaneers at Ron Yary Stadium, thus ending Artesia head coach Joe Veach’s dreams of finishing the season with a .500 record. Bellflower returned an interception for a touchdown and a fumble that led to a field goal in the first half as it led 17-0 at the break.

“I thought we came out flat,” Veach said. “We didn’t play with any energy. We made mistakes across the board on offense and that’s what killed us. Defensively, I thought we played a good first half. We gave them 21 points; they only took 17. They should have scored 21 on us in the first half. Offensively, we just had nothing going.”

The Pioneers (3-6 overall, 1-4 in the Suburban League) had driven to the Bellflower 24-yard line on their opening possession of the game. But an ill-advised pass thrown from senior quarterback Jimmy Rodriguez found the hands of Devon Cooley, who went 80 yards the opposite direction for a touchdown.

Then two plays into the second quarter, a fumble at the Bellflower 44-yard line was scooped up by Jonathan Castillo, who returned it to the Artesia 19-yard line. Almost two and a half minutes later, Roman Delgado booted a 28-yard field goal to give the hosts a 10-0 lead.

“We just didn’t execute,” Veach said of the interception. “We called the play and we didn’t run the play. We didn’t have 11 guys running the play. When that happens, bad things happen. Looking back, obviously Jimmy should have tucked it in and taken a sack. But he was trying to make a play; we just didn’t execute.”

Following a three and out, the Buccaneers engineered a 10-play, 5:46 drive that ended when Austin Jones went in from a yard out. Artesia was held to 52 yards passing and 28 yards on the ground in the first half and ran 18 plays. But the tide would quickly shift in the first five minutes of the second half.

Two straight first downs eventually led to Rodriguez throwing a 30-yard touchdown pass to senior wide receiver Jaydon Logan on the first drive of the second half. Then senior Alejandro Guerrero recovered the ensuing onside kick and after driving to the Bellflower 28-yard line, senior Ezekial Diaz connected on a 44-yard field goal to bring the Pioneers back in the game.

“At halftime, we told them that we were going to keep playing and we were going to simplify what we were doing,” Veach said. “We were just going to play hard and see what kind of people we are in the second half. The second half has killed us all year and now I think you can officially say it’s not second halves. It’s just the fact that we don’t play 48 minutes.”

With the score now 23-10, senior defensive tackle Enoka Sautia picked off Demetrius Reed at the Artesia 45-yard line and returned it 10 yards. On the very next play, Logan caught a 36-yard pass from senior Cristian Rodriguez and four plays later, Jimmy Rodriguez scored from a yard out to bring Artesia to seven points again. But Wheeler ended any chance of a complete rally when he iced the game with a five-yard scoring run midway through the fourth quarter.

“The interception was a great play by Enoka,” Veach said. “It’s good to see plays like that from guys like that because he’s been in the program with us for awhile now. It’s something that we coach when we see screens-to stop, don’t chase the quarterback, get back, get depth and try to make a play. It’s something that he hasn’t always done. And so it’s great to see something like happen for a kid who gets it and is now doing what he’s coached to do.”

Artesia would try to answer by getting to the Bellflower 22-yard line but was thrown for a one-yard loss on fourth and two and Bellflower ran out the final 2:39 of the game. Jimmy Rodriguez was 20 of 29 for 180 yards and at one point, completed eight straight passes totaling 106 yards. Cristian Rodriguez caught 10 of those passes for 83 yards while Logan caught another seven passes for 89 yards. On defense, junior outside linebacker Christian Payton had 11 and a half tackles while Cristian Rodriguez added seven and a half tackles and senior linebacker Devon King another four and a half.

Artesia will end the season tonight at home against John Glenn. Not only will it be senior night, it is Artesia’s homecoming game and the school will be celebrating its 60th anniversary. The Pioneers have won nine of their past 11 meetings with the Eagles, who will be seeking their first league win on the field since 2011.

“I’m over this game,” Veach said. “We wanted to win; we beat Bellflower the last two years and I know they wanted to beat us. I told the kids we’re going to see what kind of people we are in this last week. We have one last game and how we’re going to send out our seniors, how are we going to finish our season, what are we going to go into the offseason thinking about and remembering? Are we going to remember that we showed up the last game and played great? Or are we going to remember that we turned it all in a little bit early and we laid an egg.

“Glenn is a team that’s battling for a league win which they haven’t had in awhile,” he continued. “They’re going to come out and fight and they’re going to play hard. We have to be ready for them. We don’t want anything to happen that doesn’t happen well for us.”

CERRITOS SHERIFF’S STATION Weekly Crime Summary -October 27 – November 2, 2014   

 

 

 

There were 14 Part I felony crimes reported in Cerritos this past week, a decrease of four from the previous week and the continuation of a gradual reduction over the past three weeks. The following is a breakdown of crimes by category: three residential burglaries; three commercial/other burglaries; four grand thefts; two vehicle burglaries; and two auto thefts. Deputies made six felony arrests, 11 misdemeanor arrests, five warrant arrests, and issued 92 traffic citations. The Sheriff’s dispatch center also received a total of 236 calls for service, a decrease from this year’s weekly average of 265 calls.

 

Residential Burglary:

 

17200 block Maria Ave (10/26-27): A relative checked on a home being renovated and observed the front door had been kicked in. Jewelry boxes in a bedroom were opened and on the floor, but the loss is unknown.

17800 block Kensington Ave (10/28): Suspect pried rear screen and entered open kitchen window. The home was ransacked but the loss is unknown.

16200 block Joanna Ave (10/28): Female resident arrived home and saw a man standing in the entry area inside of her front door. The Sheriff’s were immediately contacted and subsequently arrested the suspect a few blocks away. The suspect had entered through an unlocked second story window. Nothing appeared to have been stolen from the residence.

 

Commercial/Other Burglary:

 

13300 block Artesia Blvd (10/28): Suspect shattered a large glass window of a telephone store but nothing missing.

16500 block Valley View Ave (10/15-11/2): Hasp on storage locker cut and collector plates and figurines stolen.

16600 block Valley View Ave (10/31): Security guard checking vacant building observed burglary tools on the ground and called the Sheriff’s. Responding deputies arrested suspect who was trying to steal copper wire.

12500 block 183rd St (10/30): Padlock on gym locker broken and two cell phones stolen.

 

Vehicle Burglary:

 

200 Los Cerritos Center (10/27): Passenger door lock on a Chevy Suburban pried and backpack stolen.

17700 block Center Court Dr (10/30): Passenger door lock punched and third row seat stolen from a Chevy Tahoe.

 

Grand Theft: 

 

17700 Alora Ave 10/27/28): During overnight hours, a tailgate valued at $6,000 stolen from Ford pickup parked in a residential driveway.

14100 block Artesia Blvd (10/28/29): Parking lot gate lock cut and catalytic converter stolen from Isuzu box truck.

13200 block 166th St (11/1): Duffle bag containing jewelry and sunglasses that was placed near basketball court was stolen while victim playing basketball.

 

 

Grand Theft Auto

 

11400 block South St (10/30): ’96 Honda Accord stolen from shopping center, recovered in Long Beach on 10/31.

239 Los Cerritos Center (11/1): ’97 Honda Accord stolen from mall parking lot.

 

 

The City’s safety website, www.safercerritos.com, has an extensive library of crime prevention tips, disaster preparedness information, and a variety of links to other relevant sites. On the website you can join the City’s Virtual Block Club, regularly keep abreast of crime trends, and use the knowledge to protect yourself, your family, and your property. Neighborhood Watch works, and in partnership with Cerritos Sheriff’s deputies you can significantly reduce your risk of becoming a crime victim. If you “see something, say something,” and call the Cerritos Sheriff’s at (562) 860-0044.

 

Crime Prevention Town Hall Meeting Scheduled

 

Cerritos residents are invited to attend a crime prevention town hall meeting at the Cerritos Senior Center on Wednesday, November 12, 2014. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Our Community Safety Division staff will conduct a Crookology 101 presentation and provide prevention strategies for the most common crimes committed in Cerritos over the past several years. Also come and meet Captain William Cicchillo, our recently assigned station commander, who will provide information about the Sheriff’s crime fighting efforts.

 

Volunteers on Patrol Wanted

 

Looking for an interesting and useful way to serve your community? You may want to consider becoming a Sheriff’s Volunteer on Patrol. Patrolling the City in distinctly marked vehicles, VOPs assist with crime suppression, traffic control, vacation checks, special events and park patrols. They serve as additional “eyes and ears” for the Sheriff’s Department and train as first responders in the event of a major emergency or disaster. For more information, contact the City of Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266, or visit the Division office at the Cerritos Sheriff’s Station to obtain an application.

 

Neighborhood Watch Works – Block Captains Wanted

 

Neighborhood Watch Block Captains are also a valuable and important way to serve your community and neighborhood. Block Captains serve as a liaison between residents and our Sheriff’s Department by networking with neighbors, distributing information about crime incidents and trends, and providing feedback to our law enforcement personnel. Anyone interested in becoming a Block Captain is encouraged to contact the Cerritos Community Safety Division at (562) 916-1266.

 

La Mirada Crime Summary-Oct. 27 – Nov. 2, 2014

Residential Burglary
Two residential burglaries were reported last week:

• An incident was reported on the 14900 block of Costa Mesa Dr. Electronics were stolen from the residence.
• Cash was reported stolen in a burglary on the 15900 block of San Antonio Ave.

Other Structure Burglary

• A burglary was reported at a business on the 14200 block of Firestone Blvd.

Vehicle Burglary

• A window smash burglary was reported on the 14900 block of La Mirada Blvd. A bag containing jewelry and a cell phone was stolen in the incident.
• A cell phone and money was stolen from a vehicle on the 15800 block of Alicante Rd.

Grand Theft Vehicle

• A vehicle was reported stolen on the 12800 block of Duffield Ave.
• A vehicle was reported stolen from the 13800 block of Francisco Dr.
• A vehicle was reported stolen on the 11600 block of Goldendale Dr. The vehicle was recovered at a neighboring residence on the 11600 block of Hollyview Dr. after being involved in a traffic collision. A male adult suspect was taken into custody by responding deputies.

Driving in the Rain
Even if you have inspected your vehicle to prepare for the rainy season, drivers must adjust their normal driving habits to accommodate for the slippery roads. The following is a list of what drivers can do to decrease the risk of being involved in a traffic collision:

• Adjust your speed during wet weather. Rain lowers the amount of traction between tires and the road.
• Give yourself extra time to get to your destination.
• Check the tire pressure and the tire tread.
• Leave extra space between your vehicle and the car in front of you. Wet brakes will prevent your vehicle from stopping at the rate it normally stops when the brakes are dry.
• If you feel the car begin to skid, continue to look and steer in the direction you want the car to go. Don’t panic, and avoid slamming on the brakes to maintain control.
• Drive with your headlights on. As of 2005, it is California law to drive with your headlights on, day or night, when it is raining.

For more driver’s safety tips, visit the Automobile Club of Southern California (AAA) website at www.aaa.com.

La Mirada Crime Summary-Oct. 27 – Nov. 2, 2014

Residential Burglary
Two residential burglaries were reported last week:

• An incident was reported on the 14900 block of Costa Mesa Dr. Electronics were stolen from the residence.
• Cash was reported stolen in a burglary on the 15900 block of San Antonio Ave.

Other Structure Burglary

• A burglary was reported at a business on the 14200 block of Firestone Blvd.

Vehicle Burglary

• A window smash burglary was reported on the 14900 block of La Mirada Blvd. A bag containing jewelry and a cell phone was stolen in the incident.
• A cell phone and money was stolen from a vehicle on the 15800 block of Alicante Rd.

Grand Theft Vehicle

• A vehicle was reported stolen on the 12800 block of Duffield Ave.
• A vehicle was reported stolen from the 13800 block of Francisco Dr.
• A vehicle was reported stolen on the 11600 block of Goldendale Dr. The vehicle was recovered at a neighboring residence on the 11600 block of Hollyview Dr. after being involved in a traffic collision. A male adult suspect was taken into custody by responding deputies.

Driving in the Rain
Even if you have inspected your vehicle to prepare for the rainy season, drivers must adjust their normal driving habits to accommodate for the slippery roads. The following is a list of what drivers can do to decrease the risk of being involved in a traffic collision:

• Adjust your speed during wet weather. Rain lowers the amount of traction between tires and the road.
• Give yourself extra time to get to your destination.
• Check the tire pressure and the tire tread.
• Leave extra space between your vehicle and the car in front of you. Wet brakes will prevent your vehicle from stopping at the rate it normally stops when the brakes are dry.
• If you feel the car begin to skid, continue to look and steer in the direction you want the car to go. Don’t panic, and avoid slamming on the brakes to maintain control.
• Drive with your headlights on. As of 2005, it is California law to drive with your headlights on, day or night, when it is raining.

For more driver’s safety tips, visit the Automobile Club of Southern California (AAA) website at www.aaa.com.

ABCUSD Measure AA Defeated, Mendoza and Calderon Win, Apodaca and Chacon Claim Victory

By Brian Hews

Voters in Cerritos soundly rejected Measure AA, the $190 million school improvement bond with opponents garnering 7,638 votes (56%) to proponent’s 5,045 (43%).

Turnout was a paltry 23% with only 13,500 voters voting versus 52,000 registered.

Interestingly all other school improvement bonds in Los Angeles County passed including Downey’s Measure O by a margin of 8,036 to 5,244 and Norwalk’s Measure G by a margin of 7,043 to 5,461.

School improvement bonds in Azusa, Compton, Basset, Santa Monica, Torrance, Hermosa Beach, El Monte, Rosemead, Fullerton, Los Nietos, and Saugus all passed.

Proponents of measure AA in the ABCUSD outspent their opponents by margin of 3 to 1 but the barrage of lies put out by opponents, as reported in HMG-CN, seemed to turn the vote as the measure still went down to defeat.

Norwalk’s Measure B aimed at fixing the UUT in the city passes by a wide margin, 5,786 to 2,583, while Artesia’s Measure Y, which asked for a 4.9% increase in utility tax was defeated by 1,038 to 617.

In local Senate and Assembly races, former assemblymember Tony Mendoza narrowly beat termed-out Downey Councilman Mario Guerra by 4,400 votes.

Mendoza tallied 49,624 versus Guerra’s 45,264. Turnout was again around 23%.

In the local assembly race, Assemblyman Ian Caldaron beat businesswoman Rita Topalian by 1,400, votes with Calderon garnering 25,216 to Topalian’s 23,833.

In two hotly contested Central Basin Water District races, Division Two saw challenger Tom Malkasian lose to embattled CB President Robert “Bob” Apodaca who recently cost CB ratepayers $670,000 in a highly publicized sexual-harassment lawsuit.

The race attracted five opponents, diluting the voting pool and allowing Apodaca to win. Apodaca garnered nearly 10,000 votes, Malkasian 7,400, with the other challengers taking 14,000 votes. Without those challengers, Malkasian probably would have won.

CB Division Three pitted long-time director Arturo “Art” Chacon against five other candidates.

With 4,086 votes, Chacon beat out challenger Elba Romo by less than 400 votes with embattled city of Commerce Media Specialist Jason Stinnett gathering only 1,866.

Apodaca’s win is a blow to the reform minded group led by CB Director Phil Hawkins.

Hawkins wanted Malkasian to win so the reform could start, but with Apodaca winning, Director Leticia Vasquez, James Roybal, and Apodaca now hold a solid majority.

Sources are telling HMG-CN that a recall of the directors could begin very soon.

Vasquez is involved in a whistleblower lawsuit against CB that has cost CB over $300,000, Roybal was caught, by HMG-CN, earning money while in LAUSD teacher jail, a direct violation of LAUSD policy, and Apodaca has a history of costly sexual harassment lawsuits.

UPDATE: Real-Time Election Results of the Area’s Toughest Races

Results as of 10:20 PM

Norwalk Measure B

AJORITY OF VOTES CAST
Measure B   Votes Percent
UTILITY USER TAX      
YES   5,007 68.72
NO   2,279 31.28

Registration 45,074
Precincts Reporting* 44
Total Precincts 52
% Precincts Reporting 84.6

Artesia Measure Y

 

M

MAJORITY OF VOTES CAST
Measure Y   Votes Percent
UTILITY USER TAX      
YES   511 38.68
NO   810 61.32

Registration 6,819
Precincts Reporting* 5
Total Precincts 7
% Precincts Reporting 71.43

 

ABCUSD Measure AA

 

55% OF VOTES CAST
Measure AA   Votes Percent
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   4,832 42.46
NO   6,549 57.54

Registration 52,861
Precincts Reporting* 50
Total Precincts 63
% Precincts Reporting 79.37

DUSD Measure O

 

 

 

55% OF VOTES CAST
Measure O   Votes Percent
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   6,318 59.91
NO   4,228 40.09

Registration 56,146
Precincts Reporting* 53
Total Precincts 70
% Precincts Reporting 75.71

NLMUSD Measure G

 

 

 

55% OF VOTES CAST
Measure G   Votes Percent
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   5,692 56.27
NO   4,424 43.73

Registration 56,918
Precincts Reporting* 48
Total Precincts 61
% Precincts Reporting 78.69

Assembly 57

 

Voter Nominated
Voter Nominated Party Votes Percent
RITA TOPALIAN Pref: REP  13,873 50.19
IAN C CALDERON Pref: DEM  13,770 49.81

Registration 220,928
Precincts Reporting* 133
Total Precincts 269
% Precincts Reporting 49.44

 

   

 

 

State Senate 32

V

oter Nominated Party Votes Percent
TONY MENDOZA Pref: DEM  31,242 50.61
MARIO A GUERRA Pref: REP  30,489 49.39

Registration 421,593
Precincts Reporting* 281
Total Precincts 488
% Precincts Reporting 57.58

 

     

Central Basin Water

 

date Party Votes Percent
ROBERT O APODACA   6,325 34.09
TOM MALKASIAN   4,252 22.92
JAMES E BECERRA   3,120 16.82
NOEL A JAIMES   2,620 14.12
L HILARY BARBA   2,236 12.05

Registration 159,439
Precincts Reporting* 102
Total Precincts 185
% Precincts Reporting 55.14

 

*Ballots cast in Vote by Mail (VBM) precincts are counted in the first bulletin.
These tallied VBM precincts are reflected in the “Precincts Reporting” figure.
There are 343 VBM precincts.


 
 
Candidate Party Votes Percent
ARTURO CHACON   1,586 31.25
ELBA ROMO   1,148 22.62
C J SALGADO   1,023 20.16
J GARDEA-STINNETT   645 12.71
MARIO GOMEZ   514 10.13
ANTHONY FELIX JR   159 3.13
Registration 95,172
Precincts Reporting* 32
Total Precincts 112
% Precincts Reporting 28.57
WRD
JOHN ALLEN   7,484 34.56
GERRIE SCHIPSKE   4,532 20.93
LYNN V DYMALLY   4,399 20.32
TONIA REYES URANGA   1,952 9.01
MASON B INOCENTES   1,686 7.79
LARRY S ANDRE   1,600 7.39
Registration 380,564
Precincts Reporting* 16
Total Precincts 407
% Precincts Reporting 3.93


 
Candidate Party Votes Percent
SERGIO J CALDERON   5,127 65.31
GERARDO RODRIGUEZ   2,723 34.69
Registration 256,070
Precincts Reporting* 26
Total Precincts 298
% Precincts Reporting 8.72
CERRITOS COLLEGE

OHN PAUL DRAYER   708 60.31
DAWN DUNTON   466 39.69

Registration 25,717
Precincts Reporting* 2
Total Precincts 32
% Precincts Reporting 6.25

 

S

SHIN LIU   4,047 55.63
ARMIN REYES   3,228 44.37

Registration 33,178
Precincts Reporting* 34
Total Precincts 39
% Precincts Reporting 87.18 
     

 

ASSESSOR

 

Candidate Party Votes Percent
JEFFREY PRANG   126,278 52.68
JOHN MORRIS   113,439 47.32

Registration 4,544,455
Precincts Reporting* 359
Total Precincts 5,027
% Precincts Reporting 7.14

 

 

Real-Time Election Results of the Area’s Toughest Races

Results as of 8:17 PM

Norwalk Measure B

MAJORITY OF VOTES CAST
Measure B   Votes Percent
UTILITY USER TAX      
YES   1,403 71.47
NO   560 28.53

Registration 45,074
Precincts Reporting* 3
Total Precincts 52
% Precincts Reporting 5.77

 

Artesia Measure Y

MAJORITY OF VOTES CAST
Measure Y   Votes Percent
UTILITY USER TAX      
YES   214 41.31
NO   304 58.69

Registration 6,819
Precincts Reporting* 0
Total Precincts 7
% Precincts Reporting 0

 

ABCUSD Measure AA

 

SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   1,800 39.68
NO   2,736 60.32

Registration 52,861
Precincts Reporting* 8
Total Precincts 63
% Precincts Reporting 12.70

 

DUSD Measure O

 

5% OF VOTES CAST
Measure O   Votes Percent
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   1,683 56.67
NO   1,287 43.33

Registration 56,146
Precincts Reporting* 1
Total Precincts 70
% Precincts Reporting 1.43

 

NLMUSD Measure G

55% OF VOTES CAST
Measure G   Votes Percent
SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BONDS      
YES   1,846 57.15
NO   1,384 42.85

Registration 56,918
Precincts Reporting* 2
Total Precincts 61
% Precincts Reporting 3.28

Assembly 57

RITA TOPALIAN Pref: REP  6,938 54.93
IAN C CALDERON Pref: DEM  5,693 45.07

Registration 220,928
Precincts Reporting* 30
Total Precincts 269
% Precincts Reporting 11.15

 

 

State Senate 32

Tony Mendoza
(Party Preference: DEM)
12,445
44.7%
  Mario A. Guerra
(Party Preference: REP)
15,412
55.3%
 
 

 

Central Basin Water

 

*Ballots cast in Vote by Mail (VBM) precincts are counted in the first bulletin.
These tallied VBM precincts are reflected in the “Precincts Reporting” figure.
There are 343 VBM precincts.

CENTRAL BASIN MUNI WATER     BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIV 2
 
   ROBERT O APODACA                                           2,811    37.94
   TOM MALKASIAN                                              1,749    23.60
   NOEL A JAIMES                                              1,058    14.28
   JAMES E BECERRA                                            1,007    13.59
   L HILARY BARBA                                               785    10.59
 
TOTAL PRECINCTS        185            PRECINCTS REPORTING*       15     8.11
REGISTRATION       159,439
 
 

*Ballots cast in Vote by Mail (VBM) precincts are counted in the first bulletin.
These tallied VBM precincts are reflected in the “Precincts Reporting” figure.
There are 343 VBM precincts.


Votes  Percent
CENTRAL BASIN MUNI WATER     BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIV 3
 
   ARTURO CHACON                                              1,055    40.07
   ELBA ROMO                                                    495    18.80
   C J SALGADO                                                  466    17.70
   J GARDEA-STINNETT                                            320    12.15
   MARIO GOMEZ                                                  212     8.05
   ANTHONY FELIX JR                                              85     3.23
 
TOTAL PRECINCTS        112            PRECINCTS REPORTING*       12    10.71
REGISTRATION        95,172

WRD

ATER REPLENISH OF SO CAL    BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIV 1
 
   W H MURRAY JR                                              5,877    60.33
   DANIELA CALDERON                                           1,473    15.12
   JAMES T LAW                                                1,090    11.19
   JOHNNIE ROBERTS JR                                           852     8.75
   MERVIN EVANS                                                 450     4.62
 
TOTAL PRECINCTS        337            PRECINCTS REPORTING*        9     2.67
REGISTRATION       310,092
 
 

Return to WATER DISTRICTS contest list 
Return to RACE MENU

*Ballots cast in Vote by Mail (VBM) precincts are counted in the first bulletin.
These tallied VBM precincts are reflected in the "Precincts Reporting" figure.
There are 343 VBM precincts.

                                                              Votes  Percent
WATER REPLENISH OF SO CAL    BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIV 3
 
   JOHN ALLEN                                                 7,382    34.63
   GERRIE SCHIPSKE                                            4,487    21.05
   LYNN V DYMALLY                                             4,342    20.37
   TONIA REYES URANGA                                         1,881     8.82
   MASON B INOCENTES                                          1,644     7.71
   LARRY S ANDRE                                              1,580     7.41
 
TOTAL PRECINCTS        407            PRECINCTS REPORTING*       13     3.19
REGISTRATION       380,564
ATER REPLENISH OF SO CAL    BOARD OF DIRECTORS DIV 4
 
   SERGIO J CALDERON                                          4,879    65.77
   GERARDO RODRIGUEZ                                          2,539    34.23
 
TOTAL PRECINCTS        298            PRECINCTS REPORTING*       21     7.05
REGISTRATION       256,070



CERRITOS COLLEGE

JOHN PAUL DRAYER   708 60.31
DAWN DUNTON   466 39.69
Registration 25,717
Precincts Reporting* 2
Total Precincts 32
% Precincts Reporting 6.25

 

SHIN LIU   1,754 61.61
ARMIN REYES   1,093 38.39

Registration 33,178
Precincts Reporting* 4
Total Precincts 39
% Precincts Reporting 10.26

 

ASSESSOR

Candidate Party Votes Percent
JEFFREY PRANG   125,537 52.71
JOHN MORRIS   112,650 47.29

Registration 4,544,455
Precincts Reporting* 343
Total Precincts 5,027
% Precincts Reporting 6.82

 

 

La Mirada Crime Summary Oct. 20 – Oct. 26, 2014

Residents encouraged to remain vigilant
There are a variety of crimes that affect our neighborhoods every day. Although larger crimes are more easily identified, residents are reminded to be on the lookout for these smaller, but threatening crimes impacting our community and quality of life:

Scavenging

Scavenging or removing items from trash cans or recycling containers is strictly prohibited in La Mirada. In some cases, scavenging is the preferred method used by criminals to engage in identity theft. Violators are subject to strict fines, penalties, and possibly jail time. To report scavenging, call the La Mirada Community Sheriff’s Station at (562) 902-2960.

Solicitors

It is unlawful for any person to engage in commercial solicitation activities in La Mirada without a permit. Each solicitor shall have the City’s permit identification card in possession at all times, and shall present the information upon request.

To safeguard your home and your family from unlicensed solicitors, follow these tips:

• Ask deliverymen, solicitors and strangers for their credentials, the company they are representing, a contact number, and the reason for their visit.
• If you don’t feel comfortable answering the door, don’t.
• Make your presence in the house known to visitors to deter potential burglars targeting empty homes.
• Be cautious at all times. Keep the door locked.

If you come in contact with a solicitor, contact the La Mirada Community Sheriff’s Station at (562) 902-2960 to report any suspicious activity.

Graffiti

Graffiti is unsightly and may encourage further vandalism or other criminal activity. Residents and businesses can assist by reporting graffiti immediately. A $1,000 cash reward may be given for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a graffiti vandal.

The 24-hour Graffiti removal Hotline is: (562) 943-1557 or (714) 522-5858.

To report graffiti online, click here to submit a report.

To report a crime in progress, call 9-11 or the Community Sheriff’s Station at (562) 902-2960. Be a good witness and gather as much information as possible, such as a description of the suspect, license plate information, and direction of travel. Never put yourself in danger by intervening with a crime in progress.

Residential Burglary
A residential burglary was reported on the 11700 block of Hollyview Dr. The loss from the location is unknown.

Vehicle Burglary
A vehicle burglary was reported on the 12000 block of Santa Gertrudes Ave.

Grand Theft
Two grand thefts were reported last week. A theft of batteries and copper cable was reported from a motor home and trailers parked on the 14900 block of Firestone Blvd. Two tablet computers were reported stolen in an incident on the 15600 block of Yellowbrook Ln.

Assemblyman Ian Calderon Violated Laws by Abusing State Automobile Policy 

 

Assemblyman Ian Calderon. Photo by Randy Economy.

 

By Randy Economy and Brian Hews

Hews Media Group-Community Newspaper has obtained documents that show California State Assemblyman Ian Calderon filed reports with the California Secretary of State indicating he spent over $13,000 in campaign funds to maintain and operate a personal vehicle, when those campaign funds should have only be spent on a committee leased or owned vehicle.

State law mandates that an Assembly Member-or State Senator’s-campaign committee must be the titleholder or lessee of the car when expenses are submitted and paid that are related to the car such as gas, maintenance, or lease payments.

Chapter 10 of the 2008 FPPC Campaign Manual states, “when making payments associated with leasing, purchasing or operating a vehicle such as insurance, and/or maintenance and repairs, the campaign committee must be the lessee or hold title to the vehicle.”

In 2011, the California Citizens Compensation Committee amended the Salary and Benefits package of legislators saying, “members of the legislature shall no longer receive any of the existing benefits under the existing automobile policy including but not limited to allowance, insurance, repairs, gas and oil, and a leased automobile. Members of the legislature shall receive an automobile allowance of $300 per month.

In filings obtained and reviewed by HMG-CN, the 29 year-old first term lawmaker does not indicate any expenditures associated with the lease or purchase of the vehicle by his political campaign committee.

In reviewing Calderon’s filings with the Fair Political Practices Commission and the California Secretary of State, the lawmaker charged new tire purchases, had a custom windshield installed, and billed taxpayers $1,000 for a “BMW Service.”

Other receipts obtained by HMG-CN show that Calderon spent over $11,000 at various gas stations and mini-marts.

Receipts obtained by HMG-CN also show that Calderon was reimbursed for large gas purchases in successive days, sometimes multiple large purchases of between $50 and $80 on the same calendar day.

The analyses also shows that Calderon is among the top legislators in term of automobile expenses, beating out other lawmakers in much larger districts.

On New Year’s Eve in 2012, he spent $87.51 and $76.14 at the same Circle K.  He listed the expenses as “Candidate Travel, Lodging and Meals.”

In total, he made more than 170 different credit card purchases at gas stations between May 21, 2012 and December 18, 2013.

The California Political Reform Act expressly prohibits the use of campaign funds for personal benefit.

Sources are also telling HMG-CN that some expenses listed as being incurred in his district on a certain date were reported while Calderon was in Sacramento.

Calderon is currently engaged in a heated battle of in the 57th Assembly District against Whittier Family Law Attorney Rita Topalian. The district includes Norwalk, Whittier, Santa Fe Springs and surrounding areas.  In the June primary election, Topalian actually out polled Calderon by nearly four percentage points in the head-to-head match-up.

The Topalian campaign slammed Calderon on Tuesday in an interview with the newspaper.

“Ian Calderon has repeatedly broken the rules and needs to be held accountable to the voters,” a Topalian campaign spokesperson said.

Both of Calderon’s uncles, State Senator Ronald Calderon and former State Assemblyman Thomas Calderon are facing dozens of felony counts for accepting bribes, extortion, money laundering, and perjury in a massive sting undercover sting operation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the United States Attorney’s Office as well as other local law enforcement groups.

Ian Calderon has maintained his innocence, has denied any participation or association with his two uncles, and has tried to distance himself from his family ties.

This despite Calderon giving his dad, Charles Calderon, $60,000 for his campaign to become a Los Angeles Superior Court Judge.

Charles Calderon has not been named as a suspect in the massive criminal probe but investigators have been tight lipped in regards to the details of the case that has been ongoing for more than five years.

See campaign reports, click here.

editor@cerritosnews.net

twitter @cerritosnews

randy@cerritosnews.net

twitter @repotereconomy

 

Ensuring A Transparent Commerce

%d bloggers like this: